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Skin Conditions

Acne

One of the most common skin conditions reported in the United States, acne affects men and women of all ages and ethnicities. Acne consists of pimples, lumps, cysts, nodules, blackheads and whiteheads, occurring mainly on the face, neck, back, shoulders and chest. » Read More

 

Psoriasis

If you are looking for a detail-oriented dermatologist who helps Philadelphia, PA, psoriasis disease patients, consider getting in touch with Milstein Batta Dermatology LLC. When you have psoriasis, the red and inflamed patches of skin that come with the disease can feel like a life sentence. » Read More

 

Actinic Keratosis

Actinic keratosis or solar keratosis is a scaly or crusty bump occurring on the skins surface. Colors may be light or dark, tan, pink, red, or multi-colored. Most likely to appear on the face, ears, scalp, neck, backs of the hands and forearms, shoulders, and lips, actinic keratoses predominately occur on sun exposed areas. » Read More

 

Hair Loss

Hair loss (alopecia) can affect just your scalp or your entire body. It can be the result of heredity, certain medications or an underlying medical condition. Baldness typically refers to excessive hair loss from your scalp. Some people prefer to let their baldness run its course untreated and unhidden. Others may cover it up with hairstyles, makeup, hats or scarves. And still others choose one of the medications or surgical procedures that are available to treat hair loss. » Read More

 

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

Atopic dermatitis (eczema) is an itchy inflammation of your skin. It’s a long-lasting (chronic) condition that may be accompanied by asthma or hay fever. Eczema may affect any area of your skin, but it typically appears on your arms and behind your knees. It tends to flare periodically and then subside. The cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but it may result from a combination of inherited tendencies for sensitive skin and malfunction in the body’s immune system. Self-care measures, such as avoiding soaps or other irritants and applying creams or ointments, can help relieve itching. See your doctor if your symptoms distract you from your daily routines or prevent you from sleeping. » Read More

 

Hives

Hives also known as urticaria (ur-tih-KAR-e-uh) is a skin reaction that causes raised, red, itchy welts (wheals, or swellings) in sizes ranging from small spots to large blotches several inches in diameter. Individual welts appear and fade as the reaction runs its course. Angioedema is a related type of swelling that affects deeper layers in your skin, often around your eyes and lips. » Read More

 

Moles

Moles, known medically as nevi, are clusters of pigmented cells that often appear as small, dark brown spots. However, moles can come in a range of colors and can develop virtually anywhere on your body. Most moles are harmless, but in rare cases, moles may become cancerous. Monitoring moles and other pigmented patches is an important step in detecting skin cancer, especially malignant melanoma. Not all melanomas develop from pre-existing moles, however. Some moles may begin as a new growth on the skin. » Read More

 

Warts

Common warts are small, grainy skin growths that occur most often on your fingers or hands. Rough to the touch, common warts also often feature a pattern of tiny black dots sometimes called seeds which are small, clotted blood vessels. Common warts are caused by a virus and are transmitted by touch. Children and young adults are more likely to develop common warts, as are people who have weakened immune systems. Common warts usually disappear on their own, but many people choose to remove them because they find them bothersome or embarrassing. » Read More

 

Molluscum

Molluscum contagiosum (mo-LUS-kum kun-tay-jee-OH-sum) is a relatively common viral infection of the skin that results in round, firm, painless bumps ranging in size from a pinhead to a pencil eraser. If the bumps are scratched or injured, the infection can spread to surrounding skin. Though most common in children, molluscum contagiosum can affect adults as well particularly those with weakened immune systems. In adults, molluscum contagiosum involving the genitals is considered a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Molluscum contagiosum spreads through direct person-to-person contact and through contact with contaminated objects. The bumps associated with molluscum contagiosum usually disappear within a year without treatment but doctor-assisted removal is also an option. » Read More

 

Rosacea

Rosacea (roe-ZAY-she-uh) is a common skin condition that causes redness in your face and often produces small, red, pus-filled bumps. Although rosacea can occur in anyone, it most commonly affects middle-aged women who have fair skin. Left untreated, rosacea tends to worsen over time. Rosacea signs and symptoms may flare up for a period of weeks to months and then diminish before flaring up again. Rosacea can be mistaken for acne, an allergic reaction or other skin problems. » Read More

 

Seborrheic dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis (seb-o-REE-ik der-muh-TI-tis) is a common skin disorder that mainly affects your scalp, causing scaly, itchy, red skin and stubborn dandruff. In infants, seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp is known as cradle cap. Seborrheic dermatitis can also affect your face, upper chest, back and other areas of your body that have many oil (sebaceous) glands. Seborrheic dermatitis doesn’t affect your overall health, but it can be uncomfortable and cause embarrassment when it develops on visible parts of your body. It isn’t contagious, and it’s not a sign of poor personal hygiene. Seborrheic dermatitis tends to recur, but you may be able to manage flare-ups by recognizing its signs and symptoms and by using a combination of self-care steps and over-the-counter (nonprescription) medications. » Read More

 

Vitiligo

Vitiligo (vit-ih-LI-go) is a condition in which your skin loses melanin, the pigment that determines the color of your skin, hair and eyes. Vitiligo occurs when the cells that produce melanin die or no longer form melanin, causing slowly enlarging white patches of irregular shapes to appear on your skin. Vitiligo affects all races, but may be more noticeable in people with darker skin. Vitiligo usually starts as small areas of pigment loss that spread with time. There is no cure for vitiligo. The goal of treatment is to stop or slow the progression of pigment loss and, if you desire, attempt to return some color to your skin. » Read More

 

Squamous cell carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the thin, flat squamous cells that make up the outer layer of the skin.
Squamous cell carcinoma is usually not life-threatening, though it can be aggressive in some cases. Untreated, squamous cell carcinoma can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications. Most squamous cell carcinomas result from prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, either from sunlight or from tanning beds or lamps. Avoiding UV light helps reduce your risk of squamous cell carcinoma and other forms of skin cancer. » Read More

 

Basal cell carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma begins in the basal cells a type of cell within the skin that produces new skin cells as old ones die off. Basal cell carcinoma often appears as a waxy bump, though it can take other forms. Basal cell carcinoma occurs most often on areas of the skin that are often exposed to the sun, such as your face and neck. Most basal cell carcinomas are thought to be caused by long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight. Avoiding the sun and using sunscreen may help protect against basal cell carcinoma. » Read More

 

Melanoma

Melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, develops in the cells (melanocytes) that produce melanin the pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma can also form in your eyes and, rarely, in internal organs, such as your intestines. » Read More